Tag Archives: bounded accuracy

The obvious innovation in fifth-edition Dungeons & Dragons that no designer saw before

Stirrups. Zero. Shipping containers. Luggage with wheels. All these innovations seem obvious in hindsight. But they went undiscovered for millennia, until someone’s bright idea changed the world—or at least put airport porters out of work. Even those hotel shower rods … Continue reading

Posted in Role-playing game design, Role-playing game history | Tagged , , , , , | 15 Comments

Proficiency and bounded accuracy in D&D Next

In my last post, I wrote about how the Dungeons & Dragons Next proficiency bonus jams all the tables and rules for attack bonuses and saving throw bonuses and check bonuses into a single rising bonus. This consolidation yields a … Continue reading

Posted in D&D fifth edition, Role-playing game design | Tagged , , , , , | 61 Comments

Multiple attacks, ability checks, and keyed illustrations revisited

At Gen Con 2013, I’ll be running the Dungeons & Dragons Next adventure Murder in Baldur’s Gate most mornings and afternoons. If you attend Gen Con, check my photo in my About section, and then find me and say hello. … Continue reading

Posted in D&D fifth edition, Role-playing game history | Tagged , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

Changing the balance of power

(This post continues a discussion I started in “What does D&D have to do with ironclad ships?”) Skip Williams‘s second edition adventure Axe of Dwarvish Lords staged a type of battle no Dungeons & Dragons adventure has tried before or … Continue reading

Posted in D&D fifth edition | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

D&D Next trades to-hit bonuses for enhanced damage

(This post continues a discussion I started in “What does D&D have to do with ironclad ships?”) As I discussed in “Riding the power curve,” the next iteration of Dungeons & Dragons attempts to straighten out fourth edition’s logarithmic power … Continue reading

Posted in D&D fifth edition, D&D fourth edition | Tagged , , , , | 4 Comments

Bounded accuracy and matters of taste

(This post continues a discussion I started in “What does D&D have to do with ironclad ships?”) In my last post, I wrote about how to-hit and damage bonuses contributed to Dungeons & Dragons’ power curve. When we compare D&D … Continue reading

Posted in D&D fifth edition, D&D fourth edition | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Two Problems that Provoked Bounded Accuracy

One of the key design features of D&D Next is something the designers call bounded accuracy. Bounded accuracy reins in the steady escalation of bonuses to checks and attacks that characters received in earlier editions. I love bounded accuracy. To … Continue reading

Posted in D&D fifth edition, D&D fourth edition, Role-playing game design | Tagged , , , , | 6 Comments